Opinions

Thu
02
Jul
atodd's picture

In order to shoe a horse it always pays to catch it first

There seems to be a new trend in the area of running…Barefoot. I, myself, no longer run. I have horses and they are much better at running, so I let them carry me. Anyway, the Barefoot Running “takeover” is definitely on the rise with humans. Many orthopedic sources are saying “it is healthier for the structure of the human body, to run without additional cushioning.” I do NOT agree with this statement based solely (pun intended) on past experience. Why, just this morning I stepped out on the front porch and stepped on a “goat head.” Jump, jump, **it, jump, jump **it…that really hurts. For the simple reason of personal safety, I will continue to wear shoes.

Thu
18
Jun
atodd's picture

Colorado and California – Different states, similar fates?

Tom Magstadt

Summer is beautiful in the mountains, but it's also a harbinger of horrors great and small, forest fires being among the worst and most devastating. Mud is no fun either, but without it – in the absence of abundant snow on the upper elevations and a long, slow thaw – we face something far more unforgiving.

For all our sophisticated technology and machines, soaking rains are still the best defense against forest fires. In ways we moderns often fail to recognize, the earth hasn't changed much since the Pleistocene Epoch, when mammoths and mastodons, long-horned bison, saber-toothed cats and giant ground sloths roamed the planet.

One big difference, however, is temperature. Global cooling and glaciers characterized the Pleistocene. The big worry in these times is global warming, disappearing glaciers and drought.

Heavy summer rains mean more mud, but every good thing comes with a price. If it doesn't, we're either stealing it or wasting it or both.

Wed
10
Jun
atodd's picture

Cartoon

Wed
10
Jun
atodd's picture

The ridge to the “Bridge of Heaven,” a hike up memory lane

The Old Horse Thief Trailhead is a Nolan Ryan stone's-throw from our house in Lovely Ouray. In minutes Bobbie and I are zigzagging up its wooded switchbacks, savoring fresh, pine-scented air that we’ve come to expect but now take for granted. The morning air is cool to bare skin, the trail damp from recent showers. Our bodies and minds soon warm to the uphill task and reluctantly cooperate. Life is still good.

Wed
10
Jun
atodd's picture

Pizza delivery, government style

Some of our Montrose subscribers have called recently to ask us why their newspapers have been arriving a few days later in the mail than usual. We just found out why. Instead of our out-of- county papers being shipped to Grand Junction for postal sorting, they are now being shipped to Denver!
This decision is not a local one, but a decision of your United States Postal Service.
We turn them into the Ouray post office, in turn they travel past Montrose to Denver, get sorted, then are sent back to Montrose. What do you bet they go through Montrose and Grand Junction on the way to Denver?
The efficiency of your big government at work.
There is a remedy, and we are working on it and should have it fixed in a few weeks. Thanks to our readers for alerting us.
For some reason, this kind of bureau- cracy reminds us of an exchange on the television show M*A*S*H, when Henry Blake was trying to get a special order delivered to the front line:

Fri
05
Jun
atodd's picture

Jumping up and down on the Hangman’s trap door

Suffering from a bout of cabin fever, Bobbie and I recently hiked the vertiginous Bear Creek Trail where we happened upon three runners. Two were hard bodied outdoor gals training for the Hardrock 100—an arduous hundred-mile foot race that ascends 13,000 foot passes and weaves the rugged mountains between Silverton, Ouray and Telluride. “Hardrock” says it all; it takes elite runners nearly 24 hours—all day and all night—to finish. The rest drop out or straggle in, trying to beat the 48-hour cut-off. A cumulative 34,000 feet of ups and downs at an average elevation of over 11,000 feet—abysmal weather, darkness of night and precipitous trails like Bear Creek not withstanding.

Fri
05
Jun
atodd's picture

Riddle: It's a race all who enter can win. What is it?

I was sitting on a bench near the iconic lift bridge in Duluth, Minnesota. It was early evening and I had completed Grandma's Marathon that morning. Anyone who's ever run 26.2 miles in one stretch without stopping knows the feeling: a strange mix of two extremes — exhaustion and exhilaration. It's not the runner's high that sometimes happens during a long-distance run, it's what happens when you cross the finish line of a marathon.

"Hey, Tom." The voice was familiar. So was the face.

John.  The tall young man standing in front of me, looking down and smiling, was somebody I'd admired from a distance long before we became friends.  I'd first seen John T. on a basketball floor when he led his high school team to two state basketball championships. As a college player he led South Dakota State University to two North Central Conference titles.  He had a tryout with the Boston Celtics but was cut when they activated Jo-Jo White.

Fri
05
Jun
atodd's picture

As long as it continues to fit, it fits

Here in Ouray County, I count six new restaurants opening over the next month or two. I am sure this paper will cover them as they appear on the scene so I won’t provide any spoilers at this time. And even as I write these words, I just heard that one of the proto-restaurants has failed because the money backer backed out. This reminds me that restaurants are like species and are subject to natural selection too. What works, works. That sentence may seem like a tautology but it is very powerful idea indeed.

Fri
05
Jun
atodd's picture

It’s a fair time for children and livestock alike

With the end of the school year come graduation, continuation and advancement ceremonies. In Ouray County that means community gatherings and parties. Not only do the families arrive with smiles and accolades; town folks, neighbors, community members and anyone interested in being a part of the festivities come out in droves. The end of the school year also ushers in the height of fair preparation time. The 4H kids are now busier than ever.
Cattle chores often begin at sunrise with feeding, watering, cleaning stalls and corrals. The kids must practice walking their cattle, so as to prepare for the showmanship section. The cattle have to be repeatedly groomed and washed to ensure proper behavior during the necessary bathing at the fair. These activities are the daily regime for the child entered in the Beef Division of the fair.

Thu
16
Apr
atodd's picture

The Rule of Law? Don't make me laugh…

The notice read: "You are herby summoned to APPEAR at the JOHNSON COUNTY COURTHOUSE…".  Who or what is a "herby"? I wondered. Typos happen; apparently proofreading at a certain county courthouse in Kansas doesn't.

A summons for jury duty, of course, doesn't mean you're going to be selected. It just means you're going to have at least one very slow morning waiting for something – anything – to happen. Then when it does it invariably involves listening to lawyers asking simple questions and explaining things to adults while pretending that they're talking to three-year-olds.

I'm not complaining. The experience turned out to be a civic exercise laced with laughter and comic relief. That's saying something considering that this was a criminal court and the case involved a charge of domestic violence – certainly, no laughing matter.

Pages

Subscribe to Opinions