Opinions

Wed
16
Jul
atodd's picture

Rob Pudim's weekly opinion

Rob Pudim's weekly opinion.

 

Wed
16
Jul
atodd's picture

Tribute to one of Ouray's best

Dear Editor,
What a fine service of tribute was held July 7 at the United Church of the San Juans for George Moore. George was a remarkable man, a most knowledgeable geologist, generous contributor to the Historical Society, spiritually deep and dedicated man of faith as well as a friend to many of us. He loved the San Juan Mountains and knew them as few have. Wouldn't it be great if one of the currently unnamed mountain peaks about us could be named in his honor: Mount Moore? I can think of no greater tribute to someone who has given so much of himself to us and our beloved county.
Dick Engdahl
Ridgway

Wed
16
Jul
atodd's picture

Tribute to one of Ouray's best

Dear Editor,
What a fine service of tribute was held July 7 at the United Church of the San Juans for George Moore. George was a remarkable man, a most knowledgeable geologist, generous contributor to the Historical Society, spiritually deep and dedicated man of faith as well as a friend to many of us. He loved the San Juan Mountains and knew them as few have. Wouldn't it be great if one of the currently unnamed mountain peaks about us could be named in his honor: Mount Moore? I can think of no greater tribute to someone who has given so much of himself to us and our beloved county.
Dick Engdahl
Ridgway

Wed
16
Jul
atodd's picture

Having faith in healing

“To ease another’s heartache is to forget one’s own.”
― Abraham Lincoln

Wed
16
Jul
atodd's picture

Fear, loathing and hiking in the land of lightning

One of the magical things I love about living in the San Juans is the set-your-watch-by-it arrival of the monsoon season. Seldom do thunderstorms fail to crank up sometime in the first week in July — just when June’s glaring sun and single digit humidity begins to wear on heat-intolerant mountain folk. Talk about “afternoon delight,” cool, soothing rain is mood medicine. The downside of our thunderstorms is unpredictable lightning; it can be deadly, especially for those who feel compelled to wade alpine meadows of wildflowers or bag one of our sundry peaks. Last week a group of eight hikers were stuck by lightning in Rocky Mountain National Park, followed a few days later by a couple. Sadly one person died and several were hospitalized in the first group. The lady in the second event narrowly survived; her hiking boots were literally blown off her feet.  

Wed
16
Jul
atodd's picture

Thanks, Ridgway, for your partnership

Dear Editor,
For the past three years I have served on our Town Council, from which I will step down as of July 15. In order to better address health concerns of my family, we will be moving to Durango. It is a new life chapter for us, starting with a mix of loss and gain, heaviness and hope.  
When I first placed my name on the ballot in 2011, after only a year in the community,
I was surprised to win a seat, and then pleased to receive a warm welcome by Council members. I soon learned that my initiation as a public representative had little to do with my notion of “politics.”
The term comes from the Greek word “politikos,” meaning “of, for, or relating to citizens.” This definition comes closer to my experience on the Council: open-minded thinking, respectful dialogue, creative problem solving and happy envisioning – for and
with local people. While I confess to initially wondering about the party affiliations of

Fri
27
Jun
atodd's picture

Summer discoveries of wildflowers and road trips

June, thank God. Summer has all but burst onto our mountain stage, much to the relief and glee of upstream Crevice dwellers in Lovely Ouray. Yes, long shadows are in retreat, lilac blossoms perfume the air and waterfalls gush headlong from burgundy cliffs in veils of white that’d be the envy of any blushing bride. Ours is a vertical world; the angle of scenic repose in Ouray cricks the necks of flatlanders who, beyond the rare eclipse, never had reason to look up before.
Warmth inches into the high country, eating away at the last vestiges of winters’ dirty white sheets. Blame it on Utah’s windborne red dirt; it seems to soil our snow every spring. Now, a couple feet of snow and June are all that stand between us and a bazillion alpine wildflowers bending in the breeze. As a sum- mertime loving hiker, photographer and ama- teur watercolorist, I’m itching for the upcoming “limited engagement” show.

Fri
27
Jun
atodd's picture

Wolves, sharks and crocs: World's deadliest animals?

A new study published in Science magazine shortly after this article was written has found that the current rate of species extinctions is more than 1,000 times greater than the natu- ral rate. The estimates are based on the fossil record and genetic data spanning millions of years. "These are higher than previously esti- mated and likely still underestimated. Future rates...are poised to increase. [R]apid progress in developing protected areas...are not ecolog- ically representative, nor do they optimally protect biodiversity."
Hmm. Maybe snakes are the world's dead- liest, come to think of it. Certainly, the answer is one of these four "deadly" animals, right?

Fri
27
Jun
Fri
27
Jun
atodd's picture

Fizz, Boom, Read!

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