Letters

Thu
03
Apr
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A heartfelt thanks

Dear Editor,
The Jimmy Hill family wishes to thank all of those who aided in the recovery of our beloved husband, father, son, brother, uncle, nephew and cousin. Although we cannot fully appreciate the risks that were taken in this recovery we know that many risked their very lives to dive in dangerous conditions. Without their help recovery would not have been possible. Many others offered hours of service both strategizing and executing the plans to achieve this goal that was accomplished with sympathy, respect and dignity in as timely a fashion as conditions allowed.
 
Thu
03
Apr
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School board continues to hide

Dear Editor,
The Ridgway School Board continues to play ostrich. At its March 27 meeting, Mr. Brian Donivan made an excellent, cogent, well documented presentation pointing out, with legal citations, how the board's actions are contrary to statute and established case law. He pointed out that the board's excessive use of executive sessions not only deprives the public of information on what the board is doing and why, but is contrary to law. He reminded the board that court decisions prohibit retroactive authorization of executive sessions (which this board has done) and that the records of illegally held executive sessions are in the public domain.
 
Wed
30
Oct
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Educate yourself on school board choices

Dear Editor,
To the Ridgway Community: Many of you attended the WISE School Board Candidate Forum on Oct. 7 as I did. For those of you who didn’t, I wanted to share some examples of two candidates’ responses on a few issues:
Students First
Steve Larivee, current board member, is running for another term. Mr. Larivee does not have any personal agenda other than volunteering his time, energy and nearly 40 years of K-12 education experience to benefit the students of Ridgway Schools. Steve’s responses to the questions from the audience demonstrated that he puts kids first every time. He emphasized his strong conviction when he said, “The students come first, they come second, they come third.”

Wed
30
Oct
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Standing up for education

Wed
30
Oct
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School board question

Dear Editor,

What's best for students? This question is easy to answer: Utilize the resources of the district to provide our students with the best opportunity to succeed in post secondary life opportunities.

The question not so easy to answer is how we utilize those resources to achieve this goal. That is the challenge and direct responsibility of the Board of Education and superintendent. The roles are clear. The BOE sets the vision of the district and the superintendent implements the necessary strategies to fulfill that vision.

It is easy at times, however, to allow the process of how to fulfill the vision to take precedence over the pursuit and attainment of that goal.

Fri
18
Oct
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A true discovery

Dear Editor,
Many of us might remember the Girl Scout Camp tucked away in the big trees off County Road 5. And then we remember it closed.
This past Saturday we joined many more area residents to have a look at what’s being planned for this space, now called Top of the Pines.
What a glorious space! 175 acres covered with so many Ponderosa pines, interspersed with meadows still flowering, all tucked right up against the Sneffels range of the San Juans.
For us it was true discovery. We can no longer ski or rock climb or hike steep mountain trails. Those years are memories now.
Here at Top of the Pines, we learned that trails are planned, flat as possible and wide too. For us this would be new hiking space.
We found the main building easily, structurally sound now but still unfinished. When work is completed, this will offer a full kitchen, indoor restrooms, meeting space for 150, even.

Fri
18
Oct
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Obamacare undermines freedom

Dear Editor,
Don’t get me wrong. I’m an avid mountain biker and was just over in Telluride last week laboring up the Galloping Goose. But if I had to choose between a few miles of new bike trail in Ridgway right now (we all know it will be built eventually) and saddling myself and my heirs with Obamacare in perpetuity, I’d say hold off on the bike trail. A recent letter writer to your opinion pages didn’t know what your readers thought of Obamacare.

Mon
30
Sep
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Thanks for sign help

Dear Editor,

The wayfinding trail signs in the Dennis Weaver Memorial Park were recently installed — they have great character, and kudos to In Design Signs for creating them.
Many thanks to those who helped make this project a reality: Doug Canright; Jen Coates; Joanne Fagan; Don Haskell; Devin Overton; Danny Powers; Jeff Rivera; Julie Wyrick; Gerry, Jess and Rusty Weaver; the Ridgway Parks and Trails Committee; and the “Groundhog.” Next time you're out in the park, take a hike or bike ride, check out the signs and don’t get lost!
Also, the summit of the main trail is now “Ridgway’s Boot Hill” — if anyone wants a proper burial for an old pair of boots, please contact me and I’ll fetch ‘em.

Thanks again,

Rick Weaver

Ridgway

Mon
30
Sep
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Finding common ground

Dear Editor,
It was a hard decision to remove the Streetscape bond from the November ballot, but I believe the right one. Hard because of the years of dialogue, design, hope and outreach for a shared vision of a vibrant downtown, a community hub, a persistent idea that seeks a form and time in which to birth. And right because  our Council underestimated the degree of opposition from local businesses for this particular bond. Because as Mayor Clark said, “They are a life blood of our community,” as integral and valuable as our children, schools, parks and creative arts. In fact, one of the byproducts of their work, the “sales tax,” makes up a big portion of our town’s revenues. Shops and residents are interdependent. We cannot create a buzzing hub without them. They are us.

Mon
30
Sep
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In peace and truth

Dear Editor,
The recent mass killings of prairie dogs, poisoned to death in their natural habitat, and the killing of the two mountain lion siblings in Ouray, have prompted this letter.
The young lions were guilty of nothing except trying to survive in a world where humans drive too fast on the highway, and where people need to take extra precautions to keep their livestock safe from the natural predators in the area. The prairie dogs are also innocent. If we are going to take the risk of living here, we must also be prepared to endure the consequences of it.
Mountain lions were regarded as sacred by most Native American tribes; so was this land. Instead of reacting out of fear, everyone who lives in this area ought to be grateful for the amazing access to wildlife and the privilege (not a right) that we have of being able to share this space with the animals that reside here.

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